Welcome to the Part 107 Knowledge Center

The Federal Aviation Administration requires that drone operators pass an unmanned aerial system (UAS) aeronautical knowledge test as one of the requirements for legally flying drones commercially our outside of a community based organization.

The Part 107 exam is very detail oriented and requires a lot of aviation knowledge in order to pass. Test-takers have two hours to answer 60 multiple choice questions.

The courses herein are intended for operators pursuing a commercial drone operators license and are available for purchase. These courses have been developed by certified FAA Flight Instructors, Pilots, Drone Operators, and College Professors using the latest proven leading cognitive teaching methods utilizing algorithm based adaptive learning curriculum, allowing each student to move at his or her own pace.

Our curriculum has been vetted by top commercial drone industry insurance providers. After completion the student will be given access to discounted insurance rates.

Part 107 Commercial Operators Exam Instruction and Test Preparation

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Part 107 sUAS Knowledge Test Preparation

These courses are intended for non-pilots who would like to take the FAA Part 107 knowledge exam. We have created five pretests to familiarize yourself with the topics covered. The Part 107 sUAS Knowledge Test consists of 60 multiple-choice questions. 15-25% of the exam will cover Regulations. 15-25% covers Airspace & Requirements. 11-16% covers Weather. 7-11% covers Loading & Performance. 35-45% covers Operations. You will have two hours to complete the test. A score of 70% or better is required to pass the knowledge test for a Remote Pilot Certificate with an sUAS rating.

  • Regulations

    This course covers applicable regulations relating to sUAS rating privileges, limitations, and flight operation. According to the FAA UAS Airman Certification Standards, the FAA Knowledge Test will consist of 60 multiple-choice questions. 15-25% of those questions will be regarding Regulations. — Begin Now

  • Airspace & Requirements

    This course covers airspace classification and operating requirements, and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation. According to the FAA UAS Airman Certification Standards, the FAA Knowledge Test will consist of 60 multiple-choice questions. 15-25% of the FAA Knowledge Test will consist of questions regarding Airspace and Requirements. — Begin Now

  • Weather

    This course section covers aviation weather sources and effects of weather on small UA performance. According to the FAA UAS Airman Certification Standards, the FAA Knowledge Test will consist of 60 multiple-choice questions. 11-16% of these questions are regarding Weather. — Begin Now

  • Loading & Performance

    This test covers small UA loading and performance. According to the FAA UAS Airman Certification Standards, the FAA Knowledge Test will consist of 60 multiple-choice questions. 7-11% of these questions will be regarding Loading and Performance. Exam Objectives: General loading and performance. — Effects of loading changes. — Balance, stability, and center of gravity. — The importance and use of performance data to predict the effect on the aircraft’s performance. — Begin Now

  • Operations

    This course covers sUAS operations. According to the FAA UAS Airman Certification Standards, the FAA Knowledge Test will consist of 60 multiple-choice questions. 35-45% of these questions are regarding Operations. Exam Objectives: Radio Communication Procedures. — Airport Operations. — Emergency Procedures. — Aeronautical Decision-Making. — Physiology. — Maintenance and Inspection Procedures. — Begin Now

The Top 3 Most Missed Part 107 Test Prep Questions

This may come as no surprise to those of you who have already started studying, but the three areas our students are challenged by most are:

  • Effects of Weather (Density Altitude, Thunderstorms, Temperature Inversion, etc.)
  • Weather Reports (METAR and TAF reports)
  • Reading Sectional Charts (Airspace, Latitude / Longitude, etc.)

Taking a look through our database of practice questions, below are the 10 that jump out and can hopefully give you an idea as to the kind of questions you'll be asked.

Many questions reference Figures that you’ll need to look up in the FAA’s testing supplement to properly answer the question. Here’s a link to download / open the testing supplement (35MB, PDF).

1. Which thunderstorm lifecycle stage is mostly characterized by downdrafts?

A) Cumulus
B) Dissipating
C) Mature

The correct answer is Dissipating. There’s a LOT of information in the Effects of Weather on Small UAS lecture. Make sure you go through this lecture one more time if you’re missing any rote memorization questions like this. Wind shear, density altitude, temperature inversion, the different types of fog…these are all concepts you can be tested on.

2. An aircraft announces, “left downwind for runway one six”. This means that the aircraft is on a heading of:

A) 80 degrees
B) 160 degrees
C) 340 degrees

This question tests your understanding of runway orientation and normal aircraft traffic patterns. On Runway 16, aircraft will be taking off and landing toward 160 degrees.

If an aircraft is left downwind of the runway, it means they’re flying parallel to the runway, in the opposite, downwind direction (the runway is to the pilot’s left, hence “left downwind”). So the opposite heading (or 180 degrees from) 160 degrees is 340 degrees. It can be helpful to sketch this type of question out on a separate sheet of paper.

3. While monitoring the Cooperstown CTAF you hear an aircraft announce that they are midfield left downwind to RWY 13. Where would the aircraft be relative to the runway?

A) The aircraft is East.
B) The aircraft is South.
C) The aircraft is West.

Similar to the question above, the key is to know that “left downwind” means the aircraft is flying parallel to the runway, where the runway is to the “left” of the pilot, and the aircraft is flying opposite (or 180 degrees) from the Runway 13 heading of 130 degrees. Again, if you’re having trouble with compass orientation, it can be really helpful to sketch this one out on a blank sheet of paper. Make sure to review the Airport Operations lecture!